Projects
Expressive Tags

One way to interpret the findings from MobiTags and ArtLinks is that tags are an expressive medium. Tools such as Wordles make them expressive from a consumer side. What happens if you make them more expressive from the producer side, allowing them to be placed into a picture (somewhat like Facebook's face tagging, but more general), colored, and explained? Will people use them more? Like them more? Make more sense of them? Tag differently? And can we learn more about how people tag pictures generally?

Active: none, completed project
Past: (Faculty) Dan Cosley (Undergraduate) Justin Cheng
  1. Cheng, J., Cosley, D. (2013). How annotation styles influence content and preferences. HyperText 2013. 214-218. [PDF] [Publisher]
  2. Cheng, J., Cosley, D. (2010). kultagg: ludic design for tagging interfaces. Proceedings of GROUP 2010. [PDF] [Publisher]
MobiTags
MobiTags

One of the really interesting questions technology creates and then helps us answer is how to establish relationships between the physical and virtual worlds. A number of folks at Geri Gay's Interaction Design Lab and I developed and deployed a very cool handheld museum tour that uses tagging to help people make sense of museum objects, allowing us to study the relationships between navigation in physical, information, and social spaces. One of the main findings was that people used tags not just for classifying or finding objects to look at (though they did do that too), but also as tools for cognition, both about the objects they labeled, and the people who added the tags. Further, it turns out that experts and novices use and interpret tags in a museum quite differently. A huge amount of the work was done by undergraduate researchers, which I really enjoy.

Active: none, completed project
Past: (Faculty) Dan Cosley, Geri Gay (PostDoc) Saeko Nomura (PhD) Phil Adams, Jenn Thom-Santelli (Undergraduate) Brian Alson, Jon Baxter, Soyoung Lee, Chethan Sarabu
  1. Thom-Santelli, J., Cosley, D., Gay, G. (2010). What Do You Know? Experts, Novices and Territoriality in Collaborative Systems. Proceedings of CHI 2010. [PDF] [Publisher]
  2. Cosley, D., Baxter, J., Lee, S., Alson, B., Adams, P., Nomura, S., Sarabu, C., Gay, G. (2009). MobiTags: Supporting Semantic, Spatial, and Social Interaction in Museum Spaces. Proceedings of CHI 2009. [PDF] [Publisher]
ArtLinks
ArtLinks

The idea going into this project, at Geri Gay's IDL when Dan was a postdoc there, was that museums aren't just about learning about art; they're about social and spiritual experience as well. We built a visualization that used tagging of a single object in the museum to encouraged people to see their connections to other people in the museum and their reflections on both the art and their experiences in the museum. This was moderately successful, and people valued these aspects--but also hoped for a more traditional technological experience in museums, where the technology provided extra information. This project, like MobiTags, was extra-fun because so much of the energy came from the undergrad researchers on the project.

Active: none, completed project
Past: (Faculty) Dan Cosley, Geri Gay (PostDoc) Saeko Nomura, Kirsten Boehner (Undergraduate) Jon Baxter, Andrew Herman, Jenna Holloway, Joel Lewenstein
  1. Cosley, D., Lewenstein, J., Herman, A., Holloway, J., Baxter, J., Nomura, S., Boehner, K., Gay, G. (2008). ArtLinks: Fostering Social Awareness and Reflection in Museums. Proceedings of CHI 2008. [PDF] [Publisher]